Maintaining Healthy Riparian Lands in the Urban Landscape Highlights Workshop Set for Nov. 15 in Kyle

Posted: October 31, 2017

For more information
Nick Dornak, 512-213-7389,

http://plumcreek.tamu.edu/media/28302/15Nov2017_REVISED_UrbanRiparianWorkshop_PR.pdf

KYLE – The Plum Creek Watershed Partnership and City of Kyle welcome the public to attend a free workshop and field study to highlight the value of maintaining healthy riparian ecosystems in the urban landscape on November 15 at the City of Kyle, Fire Station #1 – Community Room.

Fire Station #1 is located at 210 W. Moore Street, Kyle, TX 78640.  

Sign in begins at 9 a.m. in the Community Room with expert presentations in the morning and lunch on your own. The workshop will reconvene at 1 p.m. with an urban riparian field study of Kyle’s Steeplechase Park. There is no cost to attend the workshop. Coffee and light snacks will be provided.

“We often think of riparian areas as being of value to rural and agricultural lands, but sometimes we fail to appreciate the creeks, draws and ditches that drain urban or suburban lands.  They have been sacrifice areas of discounted value to developers and builders.  Sometimes they have become dump grounds or homeless camps. Often they are misunderstood or underappreciated for the ecosystem services and community benefit they can provide as functional components of the landscape,” said Sky Jones-Lewey, Resource Protection and Education Director with the Nueces River Authority and featured speaker for the workshop.

“We are thrilled to have Sky Jones-Lewey as our guide for this workshop and field study,” said Nick Dornak, Plum Creek Watershed Coordinator.

Jones-Lewey’s work to educate Nueces River watershed landowners about riparian function and to create a model for possible statewide efforts earned her the designation of Texas Parks and Wildlife, Lone Star Land Steward in 2014.

“How can we realize the clean water and recreational benefits from functional riparian and wetland areas in urban and suburban areas?  Often, it only requires a change in people’s paradigms.   Creeks will usually ‘fix’ themselves when the activity that is hindering their recovery is removed.  The difficulty lies in cultivating an appreciation for natural riparian recovery processes,” added Jones-Lewey.

RSVPs may be submitted online at http://plumcreek.tamu.edu/or by email to ndornak@plumcreekwatershed.org.  Please include “Riparian Workshop” in the subject line.  For questions or to RSVP by phone, call the Plum Creek Watershed Partnership at 512-213-7389. 

Funding for the development and support of the Plum Creek Watershed Protection Plan is provided through a Clean Water Act grant provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  For more information on how you can help restore and protect Plum Creek, go to http://plumcreek.tamu.edu/.  

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